مرکزی صفحہ AAV Today Avian Practice Management, Part II

Avian Practice Management, Part II

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جلد:
1
زبان:
english
رسالہ:
AAV Today
DOI:
10.2307/27670226
Date:
April, 1987
فائل:
PDF, 955 KB
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1987
زبان:
english
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PDF, 447 KB
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PDF, 235 KB
Association of Avian Veterinarians

Avian Practice Management, Part II
Source: AAV Today, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Jan., 1987), pp. 15-16
Published by: Association of Avian Veterinarians
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?ncctice MoHxvtfenieHt

IME: Avian Practice Management,
The Practice Mangement Panel Discus
sion held during theMiami Meeting (see
AA V Newsletter, Fall 1986) did not ad

Part II

we need to do our own complete workup.
(However, if the case has been mishandled
pretty seriously, I may call up the other

dress all of the questions prepared by the
audience for that purpose due to time
restrictions. The remaining questions were
sent tofive practitioners for their response
by mail Participating in this project were:

Q: Do you think it is important to
cover your own avian emergency calls?
Why or why not?

Susan Brown, Midwest Bird and Exotic
Animal Practice, Westchester,
Illinois;
Judy Holding, Englewood Animal Hospi
New Jersey; Albert
tal, Englewood,
Woodland
Animal Hospital,
Rollings,

BROWN: Yes! Because most emergency
to
clinics do not have the knowledge
handle the true avian emergency. Also,
most do not have the antibiotics for use in

veterinarian).

Brighton, Michigan; Eileen Rowan, Ani
mal Hospit; al
Island
of South Nassau,
New
Park,
York; and Teresa Lightfoot,
Park Animal Hospital, Pinellas Park, FL.

avian

ROLLINGS: Yes, because avian veteri
narians are few and far between in our
area.

Q: How do you address avian cases
that have been seen by another veteri
narian and have obviously been "mis
handled?"

limited expertise with avian patients.
I go over my physical findings
ROWAN:
with the client and tell them what / feel
should be done. I don't discuss what
already was done unless specifically asked.
HOLDING: Since there aren't many other
avian veterinarians in our area, I would
say that most of those kinds of cases that
we see were "mishandled" by the owner,
not the vet, and it is usually from neglect.
If it happened, I'd probably say, "I'd like
to do something different."
I listen and get to things at
that
since time has passed,
hand, stating

ROLLINGS:

I am

Unfortunately,

a

sole

is

LIGHTFOOT: We have 2 Emergency
Clinics in our area, and 5 avian practi
tioners, and we are available by telephone
as needed.

Q: How do you manage your time
for a typical first time avian visit (as
suming a trained AHT)1
LIGHTFOOT: A lot of things are done
by the technician before I see the client.
She takes the basic history, gives an exten
sive nutritional discussion, weighs species
the size of cockatiels or smaller, and if
indicated, performs a direct fecal exam
and

Gram's

stain.

practi

tioner, therefore emergency coverage
not always what it should be.

BROWN: We do not openly criticize the
other veterinarian. We attempt to address
the problems to be dealt with that day and
concentrate on healing the pet from the
time we see it onward, and not dwell on
what was done in the past. If we are
openly asked about the competency of the
other vet, we try to be as uncritical as
possible and explain that many vets have

medicine.

ROWAN: We cover evening calls, but
late night calls go to the local emergency
center. The emergency center has 2 bird
veterinarians who can be called for their
expertise if necessary.

BROWN: I think the history is probably
the most important aspect of the exam so
Imay spend up to 10 minutes on that. I
try to okay the need for testing prior to
picking up the bird so the physical exam
and sample collection for lab work can be
done all at once.

V

Kl

I.V?'H.
i?,;,

." < "

*&:

f''i VIl^fff?

Small

animal emergency clinic staff may not have the knowledge
such as foreign body removal from the crop?

for avian

emergencies,

V0L1 N0.1 1987

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All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

15

Practice McuKUfBmestt

I spend about 3-5 minutes
ROLLINGS:
each on history and physical exam, 5
minutes to formulate a plan and discuss
with the client, 2-3 minutes for specimen
collection, 5 minutes on preliminary lab
work that can be done while the client is
waiting (WBC, PCV, serum protein, swabs
of crop or cloaca), and 5-10 minutes with
the client discussing a tentative diagnosis,

^---elEE?^

medication, follow-up schedule, and gen
eral management. The office visit would
take about 30 minutes longer if the bird is
sick.

Q: What
tion?

do you use for client educa

HOLDING: We use the AAV pamphlets.
We also recommend magazines such as
Bird World, which has a Taming Forum.
have handouts on Nutri
tion, Wing Clipping, Avian Anatomy,
What Happens in Quarantine, Hand-Fed
Baby Formula, New Bird Health Exams
(what tests we run, what they mean, their
cost), The Use of Grit, and Home Care for
the 111Patient.
BROWN: We

ROWAN: We use a 5 minute video
cassette at the end of the first office visit.
We also have hand-outs that we have

Hands-on

experience

is valuable

training for avian

Nutrition and Signs of
Illness hand-outs, plus articles from several
sources as needed. I've found that the
"Feather Disorders" article from Caged
Bird Medicine
(March, 1984, Veterinary
Clinics of North America)
is valuable in
demonstrating to clients the complexity of
feather disorder problems.
have a copyrighted
ROLLINGS: We
booklet that we go over as we proceed
with the exam (including husbandry, nutri
tion).

c?an Program is located here, and I teach
the Avian and Exotic courses.
BROWN: We
had other technicians
trained by a technician who had worked
with Loni McEntee. We are now sending
our head technician out to the lab that
works with Walt Rosskopf in California
to get more hands-on experience.
ROLLINGS:

Observation,

and

experience.

hands-on

explanation

So far, I haven't trained a
in avian work at my new
practice. Before, experienced techs would
train new ones. Iwould suggest member
ship in a veterinary technician organiza
tion or AAV.

ROWAN:
technician

Q: What diagnostic or clinical equip
would
you suggest as
ment/supplies
essential as well as cost effective for a
newly

Q: How do you train technicians
avian work?

ofS.

developed

BROWN:

Isoflurane machine, good X
machine
with high detail screens and
ray
film (we use rare earth), incubator for
running in-hospital cultures, Microtainers,
Calgi swabs, eye instruments for surgery,
and electrosurgical unit.
LIGHTFOOT: Gram scale with basket,
Gram's stain kit, crop feeders, mouth
speculum, T.B. syringes, Emeraid II or
equivalent, chlamydial media, culturettes
(mini-tip), cat claw trimmers, Clinical
Avian Medicine and Surgery, 1986, Veteri
nary Clinics of North America, Caged
Bird Medicine, March, 1984.
ROWAN: Metal feeding tubes and sp?cu
lums (various sizes), small stethoscope,
mini-collection
tubes (lavender and red
CBC
and
topfor
SM?), mini-culturettes,
a lab that knows what to do with biopsy
specimens, X-ray restraining board, small
gauge needles and syringes, plastic for
collars.

avian practice?

in

I'm lucky in that the St
LIGHTFOOT:
Jr.
College Veterinary. Techni
Petersburg

(Courtesy

McDonald).

developed.
LIGHTFOOT:

technicians

HOLDING: The first things that come to
mind are proper X-ray film, incubator,
tube feeding equipment, separate room
for birds, gram scale, and laparoscope.

ROLLINGS: Hematocrit centrifuge, bin
ocular microscope, good otoscope, strong
light sources, towels for handling, T.B.
syringes, AAV Newsletters and Proceed
ings, incubator, "guts" and ear plugs.

16 THE AVIAN PRACTITIONER

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